Archives for posts with tag: Mojo

The last post revealed how a simple call to PalmSystem from your JavaScript code opens the door for you to take a stock web app with your favorite framework and turn it into a simple webOS app without having the overhead (or the wealth of cool features, in the interest of fairness) of Mojo.

Continuing with my explorations in the webOS 1.4.5 SDK, I’ve picked out a couple of other useful calls to the PalmSystem object. Both can be added to the “hello world” example I started in part one, and they’re really quick.

Free-wheeling orientation

A common requirement for mobile apps is the ability to respond to device orientation. I’m still digging around to see where you can hook into these events, but in the meantime here’s a simple call which is quite useful:

window.PalmSystem.setWindowOrientation('free');

This tells webOS to let your app rotate along with the device orientation, switching from portrait to landscape as necessary. It’s a high-value one-liner call which should serve most orientation needs.

You can also specify a “locked” orientation with different strings in place of “free”. Options are: up (default portrait), down, left and right. So if you have a side-scroller game that would benefit from horizontal presentation, just use:

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One neat discovery I found in the webOS 1.4.5 SDK is that it is possible to have a simple app which doesn’t use Mojo. Why would you want to? Load time! Mojo brings a lot to the table, but if you want to use your own favorite JavaScript framework, much of that ends up being overhead and increases your app’s load time.

Step one: Make a web app and test it in Chrome or Safari.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <title>Hello</title>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
</head>
<body>
    <h1>Hello World!</h1>
</body>
</html>

Save this into a new folder (using a folder name of “hello” in this example) as index.html. This will become your app folder. You can test your app in Chrome or Safari by simply opening this file in your browser. Not terribly impressive, but hey, it’s a start.

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